Slime Moulds - The Myxomycota

Technically these organisms are not classified with fungi, however because they share some characteristics common to amoeba and fungi, they are often included in guides featuring fungi. Fuhrer (2009) describes how the mature fruit body or 'sporangium', is a spore producing structure that develops into a creeping, slime-like mass called a plasmodium. This stage behaves like a giant amoeba feeding on bacteria, fungi and decaying organic matter. For more information on Tasmanian Slime Moulds visit the web site that Sarah Lloyd has created called Disjunct Naturalists that features her work on this amazing group. She has also written a book called 'Where the Slime Mould Creeps'.

Slime Mould
Slime Mould

Photo by Herman Anderson

Slime Mould
Slime Mould

Photo by Heather Elson

Yellow Stalked Slime Mould
Yellow Stalked Slime Mould
Stemonitis species
Stemonitis species
Stemonitis species
Stemonitis species
Stemonitis species
Stemonitis species

Sporangia stage

Stemonitis species
Stemonitis species

Sporangia stage

Lycogala epidendrum
Lycogala epidendrum

Photo by Heather Elson

Lycogala epidendrum
Lycogala epidendrum

Photo by Heather Elson.

Fuligo septica
Fuligo septica

Also known as 'Dog vomit' slime mould, shown in sporangium-producing phase. Often found on wood chips. Photo by Heather Elson.

Fulgio septica
Fulgio septica

Also known as 'Dog vomit' slime mould, shown in sporangium-producing phase. Often found on wood chips. Photo by Caroline Smith.