Tasmanian Fungi

Tasmanian Fungi

© 2020 by TasFungi

Bracket, Polypore and woody fungi

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Dictyopanus pusillus
This fungus is also known as 'little ping pong bats'. A small, wood inhabiting, pale brown polypore that grows to around 12mm across. Found in large masses usually on living and dead wet eucalyptus logs. It has been observed to colonise the same log for five years, disappearing in dry periods and returning after rain. (Queensland Mycological Society 2011) Photo by Charlie Price.
Thelephora terrestris
Shaggy brown fungus grows out of soil or radiata pine (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Herman Anderson.
Stereum ochraceoflavum
May be found on twigs or at the base of standing trees or stumps. Small brackets are only 1-1.5cm across (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Herman Anderson.
Stereum illudens
Thin and leathery, the upper surface is zoned and brown and furry, the lower surface is smooth violet brown (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Genevieve Gates.
Stereum hirsutum
Bright orange-yellow brackets that grow on dead wood. The upper surface is very hairy. Spore print is white. Smaller than S.ostrea. Photo by Genevieve Gates.
Stereum hirsutum
Bright orange-yellow brackets that grow on dead wood. The upper surface is very hairy. Spore print is white. Smaller than S.ostrea. Photo by Genevieve Gates.
Stereum hirsutum
Bright orange-yellow brackets that grow on dead wood. The upper surface is very hairy. Spore print is white. Smaller than S.ostrea. Photo by Genevieve Gates.
Fistulina hepatica
Also known as the Beef Steak fungus grows out of dead wood, has a ridged upper surface. Photo by Genevieve Gates.
Fistulina hepatica
Also known as the Beef Steak fungus grows out of dead wood, has a ridged upper surface. Photo by Genevieve Gates.
Postia punctata
This common species is found on large logs and may reach around 20cm in size. The fungus has a 'lobed' habit, with overlapping brackets where the upper surface is creamy to pale brown and white underneath. Sometimes liquid exudes from the brackets and droplets form along the edges. Photo by Heather Elson.
Postia pelliculosa
This polypore has a fibrilose reddish-brown upper surface and may be found on wood. White undersurface turns pink or brown when bruised. Photo by Wendy Mycota
Postia pelliculosa
This polypore has a fibrilose reddish-brown upper surface and may be found on wood. White undersurface turns pink or brown when bruised. Photo by Wendy Mycota
Polyporus gayanus
This gondwanan polypore species may be found on living trees and fallen branches. The spongy, variably coloured yellow, pale or reddish brown, upper surface is finely ridged with a creamy undersurface, and it has a short stipe. Photo by Wendy Mycota
Phellinus wahlbergii
Brown polypore forming flat long lived brackets to around 20cm across. Gates & Ratkowsky state that it is often found at base of dead or very old large living trees.
Phellinus wahlbergii - underside
Brown polypore forming flat long lived brackets to around 20cm across. Gates & Ratkowsky state that it is often found at base of dead or very old large living trees.
Polyporus melanopus
Dry, leathery polypore that is pale brown in youth, but then changes to blood red and then almost black. Gates & Ratkowsky state found on dead Dogwood plants. Underside features small creamy pores.
Polyporus melanopus - underside
Dry, leathery polypore that is pale brown in youth, but then changes to blood red and then almost black. Gates & Ratkowsky state found on dead Dogwood plants. Underside features small creamy pores.
Polyporus melanopus - close up pores
Dry, leathery polypore that is pale brown in youth, but then changes to blood red and then almost black. Gates & Ratkowsky state found on dead Dogwood plants. Underside features small creamy pores.
Trametes versicolor - Turkey Tail
Trametes versicolor also known as Turkey Tail, is a cosmopolitan and common fungus that grows on dead wood, it is also known to have medicinal properties. The underside of the fungus consists of small cream coloured pores.
Trametes versicolor - Turkey Tail
This photo shows the small, cream pores of the underside of T.versicolor. Trametes versicolor also known as Turkey Tail, is a cosmopolitan and common fungus that grows on dead wood, it is also known to have medicinal properties.
Trametes versicolor Turkey Tail
Photo by Helen Robertson
Trametes versicolor also known as Turkey Tail, is a cosmopolitan and common fungus that grows on dead wood, it is also known to have medicinal properties. The underside of the fungus consists of small cream coloured pores.
Stereum ostrea
This species often forms spectacular displays of multiple brackets on wood. The upper surface is brownish to orange-yellow and has a smooth undersurface. This photo was taken at Tahune Airwalk, Huon Valley. Photo by Heather Elson
Stereum ostrea
This species often forms spectacular displays of multiple brackets on wood. The upper surface is brownish to orange-yellow and has a smooth undersurface. This photo was taken at Tahune Airwalk, Huon Valley. Photo by Heather Elson
Pycnoporus coccineus
A long-lived, woody species easily spotted with its bright red-orange colouring on the upper and lower surfaces.Found on fallen branches in open areas, this species has been recorded as being used for medicinal purposes by indigenous Australians, including the Kukatja people of the Great Sandy Desert region of Western Australia who call it Tjawalirrpa. It was used as an aid to teething infants and other ailments of the mouth but it was considered poisonous if swallowed (Kalotas 1996).
Skeletocutis nivea
This fungus is approx. 3-4 cm across Often found on fallen trunks of native Dogwood or eucalypt branches. The upper surface is brown and lower, finely pored surface is white, sometimes tinged blue or brown. Photo by Geoff Carle
Trametes versicolor Turkey Tail
Photo by Herman Anderson
Trametes versicolor also known as Turkey Tail, is a cosmopolitan and common fungus that grows on dead wood, it is also known to have medicinal properties. The underside of the fungus consists of small cream coloured pores.
Trametes versicolor Turkey Tail
Photo by Herman Anderson
Trametes versicolor also known as Turkey Tail, is a cosmopolitan and common fungus that grows on dead wood, it is also known to have medicinal properties. The underside of the fungus consists of small cream coloured pores.
Perenniporia ochroleuca
This pale brown species is around 5cm across with fine creamy coloured pores on the undersurface. Photo by Charlie Price
Perenniporia ochroleuca
This pale brown species is around 5cm across with fine creamy coloured pores on the undersurface. Photo by Charlie Price
Datronia brunneoleuca
This bracket may form spectacular tiers on dead trees and fallen wood. A dark coloured upper surface with a a white undersurface that bruises dark brown. Photo by Adrian Cooper
Stereum ostrea
This species often forms spectacular displays of multiple brackets on wood. The upper surface is brownish to orange-yellow and has a smooth undersurface. Photo by Beth Heap
Ryvardenia campyla
A relatively large, white polypore that forms tiers on wood in old wet eucalypt forest. Photo by Beth Heap
Postia punctata
This common species is found on large logs and may reach around 20cm in size. The fungus has a 'lobed' habit, with overlapping brackets where the upper surface is creamy to pale brown and white underneath. Sometimes liquid exudes from the brackets and droplets form along the edges. Photo by Beth Heap
Coltricia 'robust shaggy brown'
Grows on soil and wood, blackish brown stipe, very small greyish brown pores.
Coltricia 'robust shaggy brown'
Grows on soil and wood, blackish brown stipe, very small greyish brown pores.
Podoscypha petalodes
A thin walled species that has orange-brown coloured circular shaped bands on upper surface, often found growing on buried wood. Photo by Herman Anderson
Podoscypha petalodes
A thin walled species that has orange-brown coloured circular shaped bands on upper surface, often found growing on buried wood. Photo by Herman Anderson
Amauroderma rude
Red-staining Stalked Polypore is a common native species found singularly or in groups all year round,feeding on buried rotten wood. It has been found to have more powerful anti-cancer properties than the most well-known medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidium' (Reishi mushroom) (Jao et al. 2013).The original description for the species based on a specimen from Tasmania.
Amauroderma ruda
The velvety brown cap and stem of this polypore are quite woody and hard.The cap up to 160 mm across, becomes flattened usually with a central depression with concentric zones in shades of brown. The centrally located stem may be up to 160 mm in length (Fungimap 2005).
Amauroderma ruda
Along with inhibiting breast cancer cell survival, this species has been shown to have important anti-cancer properties with 'significantly higher anti-cancer activity in killing cancer cells than the most well-known medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidium' (Reishi mushroom) (Jao et al. 2013).
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