Red and orange coloured gilled fungi gallery

Also try looking under pink, brown coloured fungi as colour changes can happen due to age and environmental factors. To search for a fungus by name, use ctrl-F and type in the species name to 'find' the species name you are looking for.  ***Scroll to the bottom of the gallery and click on the 'SHOW MORE' link at the bottom of the page to display more species.***

Tubaria rufofulva
Tubaria rufofulva

Tubaria rufofulva Caps 3-4cm across, stipe 3cm L x 0.5mm W, usually on fallen branches, with medium brown spore print. Hint of an annulus ('skirt around the stem') near the apex Photo by Elaine McDonald

Hygrocybe taekeri
Hygrocybe taekeri

Soil dwelling species with grey-green cap, bright orange gills. Photo by Chris Wilson.

Rickenella fibula
Rickenella fibula

Inhabits moist, moss laden soil in disturbed areas. It has an orange cap to around 3-10mm across becoming funnel-shaped at maturity, decurrent gills and slender stipe which tapers towards the base. White spore print (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Xeromphalina leonina
Xeromphalina leonina

This wood inhabiting species is found in groups and has small orange-brown, translucent striate caps to around 6mm across with decurrent gills. White spores (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Genevieve Gates.

Hygrocybe astatogala
Hygrocybe astatogala

Soil dwelling species with long stipe and cap that is highly variable in colour. ranges in colour between dark, dirty red, orange, yellow sometimes even greenish or combination of colours! Cap has a covering of dark fibrils that may make it appear even black ( Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky.

Pholiota aurivella
Pholiota aurivella

This spectacular wood and soil inhabiting species has orange-brown caps that can be fairly large - up to 13cm in diameter, with scales that seem to float on the glutinous caps. The stipes may be up to 15cm in length with scales and are not centrally attached (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Pat Harrison.

Pholiota aurivella
Pholiota aurivella

This spectacular wood and soil inhabiting species has orange-brown caps that can be fairly large - up to 13cm in diameter, with scales that seem to float on the glutinous caps. The stipes may be up to 15cm in length with scales and are not centrally attached (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Pat Harrison.

Mycena roseoflava
Mycena roseoflava

This species grows on small branches, pretty rosy pink cap 5-8mm across. Gills white to pale pink, decurrent with a short to 3mm long, stipe (Gates&Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Mycena roseoflava
Mycena roseoflava

This species grows on small branches, pretty rosy pink cap 5-8mm across. Gills white to pale pink, decurrent with a short to 3mm long, stipe (Gates&Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Mycena leaiana var. australis
Mycena leaiana var. australis

This species grows on wood. Caps are viscid, brown to orange-brown coloured and up to approximately 3cm across with bright orange gills (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Mycena leaiana var. australis
Mycena leaiana var. australis

This species grows on wood. Caps are viscid, brown to orange-brown coloured and up to approximately 3cm across with bright orange gills (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Leratiomyces ceres
Leratiomyces ceres

Found growing on woodchips and mulch. Greasy orange-red cap, with white tatters along the margin when young, greyish gills. Slender orange-red or pale yellow stipe (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Herman Anderson.

Leratiomyces ceres
Leratiomyces ceres

Found growing on woodchips and mulch. Greasy orange-red cap, with white tatters along the margin when young, greyish gills. Slender orange-red or pale yellow stipe (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Genevieve Gates.

Lactarius deliciosus
Lactarius deliciosus

Grows in association with pine trees. When gills are cut it bleeds orange latex-like fluid. Caps orange up to 16cm across with inrolled margin and decurrent gills. Stipe is orange with orange pits. Fruitbody bruises green (Gates&Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Lactarius deliciosus
Lactarius deliciosus

Grows in association with pine trees. When gills are cut it bleeds orange latex-like fluid. Caps orange up to 16cm across with inrolled margin and decurrent gills. Stipe is orange with orange pits. Fruitbody bruises green (Gates&Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Herman Anderson.

Lactarius deliciosus
Lactarius deliciosus

Grows in association with pine trees. When gills are cut it bleeds orange latex-like fluid. Caps orange up to 16cm across with inrolled margin and decurrent gills. Stipe is orange with orange pits. Fruitbody bruises green (Gates&Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Herman Anderson.

Amanita xanthocephala
Amanita xanthocephala

Soil dwelling species with orange cap to 3cm across, with orange-yellow membranous veil in youth, white gills, stipe with volva usually rimmed in orange-yellow (Gates&Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Amanita xanthocephala
Amanita xanthocephala

Soil dwelling species with orange cap to 3cm across, with orange-yellow membranous veil in youth, white gills, stipe with volva usually rimmed in orange-yellow (Gates&Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Mycena kuurkacea
Mycena kuurkacea

Also known as a Bleeding Mycena as when damaged it 'bleeds'. Caps and stipes reddish brown with whitish gills with red margins. Grows on wood. Photo by Heather Elson.

Mycena kuurkacea
Mycena kuurkacea

Also known as a Bleeding Mycena as when damaged it 'bleeds'. Caps and stipes reddish brown with whitish gills with red margins. Grows on wood. Photo by Heather Elson.

Cortinarius abnormis
Cortinarius abnormis

Golden brown species that grows in soil. Cap may have depressions and is viscid. Stipe has loose brown fibrils and yellow mycelium at the base (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Heather Elson.

Cyptotrama asprata
Cyptotrama asprata

Wood inhabiting species with beautiful bright orange, fibrilose cap to around 3cm across. The gills are white, stipe to 2cm long. Photo by Adrian Cooper.

Cortinarius cuphocybe
Cortinarius cuphocybe

Grows in soil, yellow-brown caps approx. 5cm across, with scales on cap, stipe is woolly. Photo by Rose Betong.

Anthracophyllum archeri
Anthracophyllum archeri

Attractive vibrant coloured brick red species that grows on wood. Causes a white rot destroying lignin in wood. White spores. Found year round. Photo by Charlie Price.

Anthracobia muelleri
Anthracobia muelleri

Usually found on burnt ground, these Small orange discs are approx. 2-4mm across. The discs have short-brown hairs clumped to form wart-like bunches around the edge (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Charlie Price.

Cheilymenia coprinaria
Cheilymenia coprinaria

This small fungus is found on dung. The small orange cushion-like forms mature into 2-5mm shallow cups or flat discs. If you have a 10X hand lens you may be able to see the fine hairs that line the edge of the discs. Photo by Charlie Price.

Cantharellus concinnus
Cantharellus concinnus

Also known as the Chanterelle, this species grows in troupes on soil in wet eucalypt forest. Easily identified by its very bright orange colouring on the cap and stipe. The gills are decurrent. Photo by Heather Elson.

Cantharellus concinnus
Cantharellus concinnus

Also known as the Chanterelle, this species grows in troupes on soil in wet eucalypt forest. Easily identified by its very bright orange colouring on the cap and stipe. The gills are decurrent. Photo by Heather Elson.

Cyttaria gunnii
Cyttaria gunnii

From late spring and throughout the summer months, single or clusters of fruit bodies develop from galls living on tree branches, into what look like an orange coloured golf balls! For more information see the link below: Photo by Chris Wilson

Laccaria 'species A'
Laccaria 'species A'

Common, soil dwelling species, pinkish-orange-red caps, stems and gills found in association with Myrtle - Nothofagus cunninghamii. PHoto by Heather Elson.

Hypholoma sublateritium
Hypholoma sublateritium

Found growing in soil, woody litter, with red-orange caps, white, tufted stipe. Gills are yellow-green, turning grey-green. Photo by Heather Elson.

Marasmius elegans
Marasmius elegans

Velvety red-brown caps with distinctive stems which is white towards the top and reddish brown at base. Grows in soil. Photo by Heather Elson.

Aurantiporus pulcherrimus
Aurantiporus pulcherrimus

Bright red-orange soft bodied bracket fungus that grows on wood. Photo by Charlie Price.

Phallus rubicundus
Phallus rubicundus

This pinky red stinkhorn fungus has distinctive smelling, sticky brown gleba at the apex that attracts insects that then disperse the spores. This species is often found in leaf litter. Photo by Heather Elson.

Callistosporium 'dry red'
Callistosporium 'dry red'

A relatively small species, but standing out due to its bright red fruit body often found growing on soil amongst moss. The caps, gills and stipe are a rusty red, dry, and the cap with a lighter coloured margin. Photo by Heather Elson.

Russula persanguinea
Russula persanguinea

Distinctive red cap with white gills and stipe which grows in soil. Photo by Heather Elson.

Russula persanguinea
Russula persanguinea

Distinctive red cap with white gills and stipe which grows in soil. Photo by Heather Elson.

Russula red-yellow
Russula red-yellow

Russula species may be notoriously difficult to identify as they go through rapid colour changes due to environmental factors. Much work needs to be done in order to correctly describe specimens in this genus. Photo by Heather Elson.

Russula red-yellow
Russula red-yellow

Russula species may be notoriously difficult to identify as they go through rapid colour changes due to environmental factors. Much work needs to be done in order to correctly describe specimens in this genus. Photo by Heather Elson.

Russula persanguinea
Russula persanguinea

Distinctive red cap with white gills and stipe which grows in soil. Photo by Heather Elson.