Blue coloured gilled fungi gallery

Also try looking under black, purple coloured fungi as colour changes can happen due to age and environmental factors. To search for a fungus by name, use ctrl-F and type in the species name to 'find' the species name you are looking for. ***Scroll to the bottom of the gallery and click on the 'SHOW MORE' link at the bottom of the page to display more species.***

Mycena interrupta
Also known as the Pixie Parasol, this species is a favourite of photographers due to its delicate translucent colouring. Often found in groups on decaying wood it has a small blue disc at the base of the stipe and white gills. Photo by Beth Heap.
Mycena interrupta
Also known as the Pixie Parasol, this species is a favourite of photographers due to its delicate translucent colouring. Often found in groups on decaying wood it has a small blue disc at the base of the stipe and white gills. Photo by Heather Elson.
Entoloma hochstetteri (virescens)
This photo is the first record for TAS. Cap Conical - broadly conical 15 - 40 mms diameter; vivid blue, glabrous, innately striate when mature, cap often splitting radially. Stipe: cylindrical; 40 - 50 × 3 - 8 mms; vivid blue at apex, fading downwards with a yellow to orange base. Gills: adnexed, fairly distant; in two series, vivid blue. Spores: pink
Habitat: rainforest, wet eucalypt
Photo by Alvin Lam
More info: http://qldfungi.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Entoloma-hochstetteri.pdf
Entoloma sp. (possibly aurantiolabes)
Photographed by Adrian Cooper 01/05/2020
Entoloma panniculus
This beautifully coloured species was the first Australian Entoloma species to be formally described from Australia in 1859. It has pale pink gills, a fairly long, slender stipe with white mycelium at base (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Heather Elson.
Entoloma panniculus
This beautifully coloured species was the first Australian Entoloma species to be formally described from Australia in 1859. It has pale pink gills, a fairly long, slender stipe with white mycelium at base (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Heather Elson.
Cortinarius metallicus
This soil dwelling species has a glutinous grey-blue cap to around 14cm across with pale orange hues in the centre and translucent striate around the margin. Pale brown gills and stipe with an annulus (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Rose Boltong.
Cortinarius rotundisporus
Found in soil, it has viscid metallic blue caps up to 7cm across with pink to violet gills when young. The stipe does not have an annulus, as opposed to the similar looking species Cortinarius metallicus. Photo by Heather Elson
Cortinarius rotundisporus
Found in soil, it has viscid metallic blue caps up to 7cm across with pink to violet gills when young. The stipe does not have an annulus, as opposed to the similar looking species Cortinarius metallicus. Photo by Heather Elson
Entoloma haasti
Dark blue umbonate cap to 5cm in diameter, stipe is blue-grey and beautiful pale pink gills (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky.
Entoloma discrepans
Soil dwelling species, small 2cm diameter cap that is blue-black, pinkish blue-grey gills with or without brown edge, stipe to 5cm (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky.
Lanzia lanaripes
This fungus looks like a tack and is usually greenish black to blackish brown and around 1cm in diameter on wood (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky.
Entoloma tasmanicum
Velvety blackish brown cap with blue stipe, gills grey-blue with black/brown margin (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo Heather Elson.
Entoloma tasmanicum
Velvety blackish brown cap with blue stipe, gills grey-blue with black/brown margin (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo Heather Elson.
Show More

Tasmanian Fungi

  • Facebook

POISONS INFORMATION:

Call Poisons Information Centre - 24 hour Telephone Advice Line on 131 126

© 2020 by TasFungi