Crusts and Resupinate Fungi

Amaurodon viridis Photo by Adrian Cooper
Amaurodon viridis Photo by Adrian Cooper

Forms a slightly bumpy sheet on the underside of wood. Recorded by Gates & Ratkowsky as appearing in May, August and November. This photo was taken in July 2021

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Steccherinum ochraceum
Steccherinum ochraceum

Photo by Genevieve Gates.

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Dentipellis leptodon
Dentipellis leptodon

Photo by Herman Anderson.

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Amaurodon viridis
Amaurodon viridis

Blue-green species forming a sheet on the underside of wood (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Dr Genevieve Gates.

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Antrodiella citrea
Antrodiella citrea

An almost fluro-yellow crust that is sometimes seen with shallow shelves. Photo by Herman Anderson.

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Flavodon flavus
Flavodon flavus

Yellow polypore with large pores growing on wood. Photo by Dr Genevieve Gates.

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Flavodon flavus
Flavodon flavus

Yellow polypore with large pores growing on wood. Photo by Dr Genevieve Gates.

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Phellinus 'resupinate'
Phellinus 'resupinate'

Dark, to reddish-brown polypore that is velvety to touch, growing to around 1metre in length on wood, pores are small. Photo by Dr Genevieve Gates.

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Rhizochaete brunnea
Rhizochaete brunnea

Red-yellow fungus that grows along wood. The fruitbody contains thick strands at the edge (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Dr Genevieve Gates.

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Serpula himantioides
Serpula himantioides

A wrinkled surface is a distinctive feature of this wood inhabiting fungus that grows to around 20cm in length (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Dr Genevieve Gates.

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Tyromyces merulinus
Tyromyces merulinus

A red-orange polypore with fine pores that can form small brackets. Often found on well-rotted Myrtle beech (Nothofagus cunninghamii). Photo by Herman Anderson.

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Hypocrea aff. Megalosulphurea
Hypocrea aff. Megalosulphurea

Slightly raised, bright yellow species commonly found on fallen native Dogwood (Pomaderris apetala) branches. The surface has small black dots called ostioles which release the spores (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014). Photo by Herman Anderson.

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