Boletes - (Fungi with pores) gallery

Generally speaking, 'Boletes' are known as 'mushrooms with pores instead of gills', as they have a familiar 'mushroom shape',  but if you look under the caps, you will see pores. Boletes may grow in close association with trees, for example Suillus spp. and pine trees, or may grow on wood or living trees (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014).

It is thought that there are probably a number of Tasmanian boletes yet to be formally described by science, so you may find something new, or not yet named. Important features to note when trying to identify boletes is to include a photograph of the underside of the cap, the trees found nearby eg: eucalyptus, along with any other photos or information.

If you have permission to take or study the fungus, nick the pores and cut the bolete in half, to see if the inner flesh or pores change colour when exposed to air, and making a note of the colour change (if any) and how quickly it happened.

Only remove a mushroom from the environment if you have permission to do so, because many of our wildlife - from microorganisms to macropods, include fungi in their diets and life cycles, and they need them to survive.

A good resource for Australian Bolete information and images is Roy Halling's Bolete website hosted by the New York Botanical Gardens - see the various Australian species listed under 'Projects' http://sweetgum.nybg.org/science/projects/boletineae/

Boletellus emodensis
Boletellus emodensis

Shaggy-capped bolete (to 13cm diam.)with large erect brownish scales tinged pink Pores: deep yellow Stains/Bruises: Blue Photo: G.Gates

press to zoom
Boletellus emodensis
Boletellus emodensis

Shaggy-capped bolete (to 13cm diam.)with large erect brownish scales tinged pink Pores: deep yellow Stains/Bruises: Blue Photo: G.Gates

press to zoom
Austroboletus lacunosus
Austroboletus lacunosus

Small bolete with a soft, yellow-brown cap to around 4cm diam. Stipe spindly, deeply pitted and covered in bitter-tasting slime. Photo: G.Gates

press to zoom
Austroboletus lacunosus Photo:Bronek Burza
Austroboletus lacunosus Photo:Bronek Burza

Small bolete with a soft, yellow-brown cap to around 4cm diam. Stipe spindly, deeply pitted and covered in bitter-tasting slime. Photo:Bronek Burza

press to zoom
Austroboletus aff. asper
Austroboletus aff. asper

Photo:Bronek Burza

press to zoom
Boletellus obscurecoccineus
Boletellus obscurecoccineus

Also known as the Rhubarb Bolete, grows on soil and has bright yellow pores that contrast with the rhubarb coloured cap and stipe. Photo by Beth Heap.

press to zoom
Boletus obscurecoccineus
Boletus obscurecoccineus

Also known as the Rhubarb Bolete, grows on soil and has bright yellow pores that contrast with the rhubarb coloured cap and stipe. Photographed by Helen Robertson.

press to zoom
Tylopilus 'purple'
Tylopilus 'purple'

An attractive soil inhabiting species with velvety purple, lilac cap to approximately 12cm across, with creamy white pores on the underside. Photograph by Heather Elson.

press to zoom
Pulveroboletus ravenelii
Pulveroboletus ravenelii

Soil inhabiting Tasmanian fungi with scattered tan coloured scales on yellow-brown cap, underside of yellow pores that bruise blue. This species also features a membranous partial veil. Photo by Heather Elson.

press to zoom
Pulveroboletus ravenelii
Pulveroboletus ravenelii

Soil inhabiting with scattered tan coloured scales on yellow-brown cap, underside of yellow pores that bruise blue. This species also features a membranous partial veil as seen here. Photo by Heather Elson.

press to zoom
Austroboletus niveus
Austroboletus niveus

White cap with pink pores on the underside. The viscid stipe is formed of a network of ridges and pits. Photo taken by Dr Helen Robertson.

press to zoom
Xerocomus aff. submentosus
Xerocomus aff. submentosus

Closely associated with wood (either growing at base of vegetation or on well decayed logs), this species has large, yellow pores that bruise blue-grey and a velvety brown cap. Photograph by Heather Elson.

press to zoom
Bolete 'Stephen'
Bolete 'Stephen'

This large, robust yellow to light brown soil inhabiting species is found through the warmer months. Bruises blue when bruised. Photograph by Heather Elson.

press to zoom
Bolete 'Stephen'
Bolete 'Stephen'

When Bolete 'stephen' is cut and the inner surface is exposed to air, a chemical reaction takes place, whereby the colour changes to blue.

press to zoom
Bolete 'Stephen'
Bolete 'Stephen'

Scratching the pores results in a blue / green / grey, discolouration almost immediately.

press to zoom
Tylopilus brunneus
Tylopilus brunneus

Formally known as Bolete 'rosy brown', grows in soil and is very common. Undersurface of cap bruises greyish blue. Inner flesh bruises orange-pink (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014).

press to zoom
Tylopilus brunneus
Tylopilus brunneus

Formally known as Bolete 'rosy brown', grows in soil and is very common. Undersurface of cap bruises greyish blue. Inner flesh bruises orange-pink (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014).

press to zoom