Fungi with pores gallery

Boletellus obscurecoccineus
Boletellus obscurecoccineus

Also known as the Rhubarb Bolete, grows on soil and has bright yellow pores that contrast with the rhubarb coloured cap and stipe. Photo by Beth Heap.

Boletus obscurecoccineus
Boletus obscurecoccineus

Also known as the Rhubarb Bolete, grows on soil and has bright yellow pores that contrast with the rhubarb coloured cap and stipe. Photographed by Helen Robertson.

Boletus obscurecoccineus
Boletus obscurecoccineus

Also known as the Rhubarb Bolete, grows on soil and has bright yellow pores that contrast with the rhubarb coloured cap and stipe.Photo taken by Heather Elson.

Bolete 'purple'
Bolete 'purple'

An attractive soil inhabiting species with velvety purple, lilac cap to approximately 12cm across, with creamy white pores on the underside. Photograph by Heather Elson.

Pulveroboletus ravenelii
Pulveroboletus ravenelii

Soil inhabiting Tasmanian fungi with scattered tan coloured scales on yellow-brown cap, underside of yellow pores that bruise blue. This species also features a membranous partial veil. Photo by Heather Elson.

Pulveroboletus ravenelii
Pulveroboletus ravenelii

Soil inhabiting with scattered tan coloured scales on yellow-brown cap, underside of yellow pores that bruise blue. This species also features a membranous partial veil as seen here. Photo by Heather Elson.

Austroboletus niveus
Austroboletus niveus

White cap with pink pores on the underside. The viscid stipe is formed of a network of ridges and pits. Photo taken by Dr Helen Robertson.

Xerocomus aff. submentosus
Xerocomus aff. submentosus

Closely associated with wood (either growing at base of vegetation or on well decayed logs), this species has large, yellow pores that bruise blue-grey and a velvety brown cap. Photograph by Heather Elson.

Bolete 'Stephen'
Bolete 'Stephen'

This large, robust yellow to light brown soil inhabiting species is found through the warmer months. Bruises blue when bruised. Photograph by Heather Elson.

Bolete 'Stephen'
Bolete 'Stephen'

When Bolete 'stephen' is cut and the inner surface is exposed to air, a chemical reaction takes place, whereby the colour changes to blue.

Bolete 'Stephen'
Bolete 'Stephen'

Scratching the pores results in a blue/green/grey discolouration almost immediately.

Porphyrellus aff. brunneus
Porphyrellus aff. brunneus

Formally known as Bolete 'rosy brown', grows in soil and is very common. Undersurface of cap bruises greyish blue. Inner flesh bruises orange-pink (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014).

Porphyrellus aff. brunneus
Porphyrellus aff. brunneus

Formally known as Bolete 'rosy brown', grows in soil and is very common. Undersurface of cap bruises greyish blue. Inner flesh bruises orange-pink (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014).

Porphyrellus aff. brunneus
Porphyrellus aff. brunneus

When cut, turns blue/black/grey

Porphyrellus aff. brunneus
Porphyrellus aff. brunneus

Formally known as Bolete 'rosy brown', grows in soil and is very common. Undersurface of cap bruises greyish blue. Inner flesh bruises orange-pink (Gates & Ratkowsky 2014).Photo by Beth Heap.