Aseroe rubra (Anemone Stinkhorn Fungus)

Aseroe rubra (Anemone Stinkhorn Fungus)

Emerges from an egg-like sac with up to 12 tentacle-like arms, a central brown gleba contains spores, and the rotting flesh odour attracts insects which help spread the spores. Photo by Heather Elson

Mycena lazulina (Tiny Blue Lights)Photo:Ryan Shan

Mycena lazulina (Tiny Blue Lights)Photo:Ryan Shan

Very tiny bioluminscent species often found on decaying tree fern rachis (branches) in damp areas. Photo: Ryan Shan

Ghost Fungus - Omphalotus nidiformis Photo: Adam Fry

Ghost Fungus - Omphalotus nidiformis Photo: Adam Fry

Bioluminscent, wood inhabiting species, often found on eucalyptus tree stumps or buried wood. Caps up to 20cm across may have a variety of tones including cream, violet, purplish grey and orange or reddish brown. White/ish spore print. (Gates & Ratkowsky 2016), Photo by Adam Fry

Mycena nargan (Nargan's Bonnet) Photo: Geoff Carle

Mycena nargan (Nargan's Bonnet) Photo: Geoff Carle

Found on moist, decaying wood, caps around 1.5cm diam., white flecks disappear with growth, and factors such as rain.Stipe (stem) up to 4cm in length. Photo by Geoff Carle

Cyttaria gunnii (Beech Orange) Photo by Chris Wilson.

Cyttaria gunnii (Beech Orange) Photo by Chris Wilson.

Parasitic fungus that grows on Myrtle spp. in the southern hemisphere. In Tasmania found on Nothofagus cunninghamii during spring through early summer. Photo by Chris Wilson

Mycelium Magic Photo by Herman Anderson.

Mycelium Magic Photo by Herman Anderson.

Photo by Herman Anderson.

Waxcap - Gliophorus chromolimoneus  Photo by Kent Thurber.

Waxcap - Gliophorus chromolimoneus Photo by Kent Thurber.

May be found in moist leaf litter in wet forests all year round. Photo by Kent Thurber.

Mycena aff. mamaku photo by Elaine McDonald

Mycena aff. mamaku photo by Elaine McDonald

Found on decaying wood. Photo by Elaine McDonald

Entoloma sp. Photo by Adrian Cooper

Entoloma sp. Photo by Adrian Cooper

Entoloma sp. Photo by Adrian Cooper

Ascocoryne sarcoides (Purple Jellydisc) Photo by Charlie Price

Ascocoryne sarcoides (Purple Jellydisc) Photo by Charlie Price

Found on decaying wood, often on cut faces of logs. The jelly-like relatively small fruit bodies, are around 3-10mm in diam. Photo by Charlie Price

Hypholoma brunneum Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky

Hypholoma brunneum Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky

Viscid brown caps, with white wisps around the margin of the cap.Greenish yellow gills have blackish hue due to dark purple brown coloured spores. Found in clusters on wood. (Gates & Ratkowsky 2016) Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky

Slime Mould - Photo by Herman Anderson

Slime Mould - Photo by Herman Anderson

Slime moulds have spores, but they are not fungi! Visit Sarah Lloyd's website on Tasmanian Slime Moulds. Photo by Herman Anderson.

Tasmanian Fungi Entoloma & Hygrocybe

Tasmanian Fungi Entoloma & Hygrocybe

Photo by Andrei Nikulinsky

Lentinellus pulvinulus - Photo by Steve Sargent.

Lentinellus pulvinulus - Photo by Steve Sargent.

Pinkish fawn, fan-like species growing on wood. Where it joins to the wood is white and hairy/fluffy. Distant, finely toothed gills. (Gates & Ratkowsky 2016). Photo by Steve Sargent

Entoloma sp. Photo by Andrei Nikuklinsky.

Entoloma sp. Photo by Andrei Nikuklinsky.

Often found on soil, mostly feeds on decaying organic matter, but larger 'Tricholoma-like' looking ones may be mycorrhizal. Entolomas have pinkish to pinkish brown spore prints. Photo by Andrei Nikuklinsky.